h1

Renwick Street

Examining Renwick Street as the differentiation between public and private spaces

Renwick Street is a single block of a street that meets with Canal Street in front of the Holland Tunnel. It was named after author/engineer/scientist James Renwick (1792-1863), a Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy at Columbia College. Since Renwick Stret begins showing up on NYC maps in the late 1830s or early 1840s, the street was named for Renwick when he was still alive, which is quite the tribute. Although the intersection itself is rampant with traffic and chaos due to the Holland Tunnel, Renwick Street is tucked away so that the environment is relatively calm and even disconnected to a degree.

Map of Renwick Street and surrounding area

Several decades ago, it was a swampy marsh known as Lispenard Meadows. In recent years, this area was zoned for residential use with construction to drain and solidify the grounds to make luxury condominiums. Now, it is considered part of Hudson Square, a fresh area that attracts many residents. The name Hudson Square refers back to when there actually was a square, at what is now the exit to the Holland Tunnel.

By the late 1700′s, Hudson Square and the surrounding area had a good amount of row houses. Then the economy became increasingly industrialized, the Hudson River Railroad was built, and so the area became a scantily populated industrial district. Printing companies in search of somewhat nicely zoned and reasonably priced areas found a home here and set up shop as well. The printing trade took a big hit during the Great Depression and again in the 1980′s, and the area has been mostly manufacturing and residential ever since.

Renwick Street’s location in a remote area in between more open spaces such as Canal Street, a very busy and popular street and the Holland Tunnel, is what inspired me to look into public spaces versus private spaces. Here, I describe the difference between the two, if they are interchangeable and what defines both. A public space is generally known as a space that is accessible to everyone at all times. New York City streets are public and accessible to general traffic and people. A private space is an area where accessibility is determined by somebody who sets the boundaries. An example of this would be an apartment, where the owner grants the permission for select people to enter.

 vs. 

                                         public street with parked cars and people on the street with no limitation                                              private residential apartment

I have come to the conclusion that New York City streets are generally public spaces but can co-exist with private spaces or even turn into a private space itself depending on many things like location, atmosphere and perception. Renwick Street demonstrates this on point. Because it is a street in New York City with the occasional car driving down it and people walking to and from their apartments, it is a public space. That much is obvious. However, because of its nestled location where it is hard to access or even notice, it can be considered private. Furthermore, it is a street full of burrowed private spaces that co-exist with one another and the public street itself. It is mostly residential and apartments are private spaces. There are construction projects that have been unfinished and untouched for a while that are closed off from the public, making those areas private. Also, there is the Renwick Gallery, a private to semi-private space. Overall, Renwick Street is comprised of private spaces that give us the general view that the street itself is not public but private due to the atmosphere that these private spaces hold. Renwick Street as a public street is really not that public because the majority of people who even venture in the area are residents of the street itself.

unsettlingclosed off construction area

Even in my visits to Renwick Street I noticed that the air was different on this street than any other street that would be considered more public and more accessible to city-goers. Overall, this issue about public and private spaces just shows us the magnificence of New York City itself, and the endless possibilities that are found here. Just like its diversity in regards to people and culture, its diversity in spaces really creates a uniqueness about this city. Every turn on a block or street can bring up worlds of differences in atmosphere and general environment although it is one city. Renwick Street is one such example in depicting the collusion of two different spheres that exist as one to make New York City as it is. It is an addition to the already existing privatized public culture that New York City encompasses.

Another characteristic that public and private spaces hold that I found to be the most interesting is their ability to shape perceptions in addition to being shaped by perceptions, such as what sound is.

Sound is an interesting thing, because it can be interpreted as music or noise. By music, I mean it as a combination of different sounds that are heard as harmonious. By noise, I mean a cacophony of unpleasant sounds that can be heard as annoyance. Depending on personal tastes and experiences, sound is music or noise.

For my street, I found recordings of sound created in public spaces and private to semiprivate, semi-public places as well because the reading mentioned that modernity was shaped in these places.

For a public space near Renwick Street, I found a video on youtube of The Holland Tunnel that focuses on  the sounds that you hear in the tunnel meshed with music. This combination of street sound and man-made sound creates an interesting mix that reinforces that sound is indeed an interesting thing — how the interpretation of sound is what determines what it is.

As for a private to semi-private space, I found a music recording from a band, Hurray, that performed in the Renwick Gallery on Renwick Street. This recording/video is what would be considered music. Since it is a performance, first of all, one has a choice whether they want to stay for it or not. The normal person would leave if this music is not music to them, but noise. Hence, I believe that this shows how the Renwick Gallery acts as a space that shapes the perception of what type of sound the performance is in the first place.

This recording/video is what would be considered music. Since it is a performance, first of all, one has a choice whether they want to stay for it or not. A normal person would leave if this music is not music to them, but noise. Hence, I believe that this shows how the Renwick Gallery acts as a space that shapes the perception of what type of sound the performance is in the first place.

In conclusion, Renwick Street and its surrounding areas gives us a glimpse into the sometimes obvious and sometimes subtle differences between public and private spaces that New York City holds. Spaces themselves can be defined by perceptions and environment, but they can also shape external things as well such as sound. This is an interesting phenomenon that is definitely worth observing.

Works Cited

http://forgotten-ny.com/2008/07/renwick-street/

——————————————————————————————————————–

SEPTEMBER 14, 2011; brief history/overview

Renwick Street is a single block of a street that meets with Canal Street in front of the Holland Tunnel. Although the intersection itself is rampant with traffic and chaos due to the Holland Tunnel, Renwick Street is tucked away so that the environment is relatively calm and even disconnected to a degree.

Several decades ago, it was a swampy marsh known as Lispenard Meadows. In recent years, this area was zoned for residential use with construction to drain and solidify the grounds to make luxury condominiums. Now, it is considered part of Hudson Square, a fresh area that attracts many residents. The name Hudson Square refers back to when there actually was a square, at what is now the exit to the Holland Tunnel.

Renwick and Canal in the 1930s

Renwick and Canal in 1930’s.

By the late 1700’s, Hudson Square and the surrounding area had a good amount of row houses. Then the economy became increasingly industrialized, the Hudson River Railroad was built, and so the area became a scantily populated industrial district. Printing companies in search of somewhat nicely zoned and reasonably priced areas found a home here and set up shop as well. The printing trade took a big hit during the Great Depression and again in the 1980’s, and the are has been mostly manufacturing and residential ever since.

renwick 3

22 Renwick today

In early 2008, real estate enthusiasts had their eye on 22 Renwick, a 12-story building with 19 residences that was meant to bring light to this bleak street that had potential to be distinguished due to its location. 22 Renwick was the only development that pulled through at this time.  The charcoal building has a penthouse with large scale windows, giving it a typical feel of a luxury building. What stands out about it is the penthouse with a double terrace.  The condo offers four penthouses priced in the mid $2 millions, and two-bedroom residences listed in the mid $1 million.

Renwick’s residential possibilities continue to expand. 304 Spring, at the corner of Renwick, is a “boutique residence” where a three-bedroom apartment, offering unobstructed river views, sold for about $3 million earlier in 2007, according to the New York Post.

This little alley is getting all the luxury a glorified little street can handle.

Works Cited

“Renwick Street.” LandmarkedNYC. N.p., 15 Dec. 2009. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
http://www.landmarkednyc.com/history/renwick-street/.

“Renwick Street between Spring and Canal .” NYC Blocks. N.p., 4 July 2007. Web.
13 Sept. 2011. <http://playingwithblocks.blogspot.com/2007/07/
renwick-street-between-spring-and-canal.html>.

——————————–

SEPTEMBER 20, 2011; “The Written Word”

street sign
As mentioned above, Renwick street is just one block, nestled in between the Holland Tunnel, Canal Street and Spring Street. Upon my visitation, I was struck at how quiet this street was. Despite the facts that it was dinnertime and the sun was getting ready to set, the area itself seems lifeless. It mainly has to do with the eerie juxtaposition of the old and new. Namely, the brick facade of buildings that were once occupied to the new, luxurious condos that just don’t seem to fit the atmosphere and setting.

eerie juxtaposition

Whereas the luxury condos stand tall with an all-glass facade, boasting their wealth, the brick facade buildings are more modest and telling of their historical place. That they are placed right next to each other calls for a series of questions: Why are there still old buildings standing? Are there more plans for reconstruction? Walking further down the street, I saw an interesting sight that left me unsettled.

unsettling

There was an old set of brick buildings that used to be full of life, abandoned. The area, closed off and uninviting, screamed for me to go away but that just sparked my curiosity. I got closer to see a sign.

abandoned brick buildings

This work permit was issued on July 7, 2011 for 15 Renwick Street with an expiration date of September 4, 2011. Clearly there was no progress. There were no machines around, no tools, and no people. Renwick Street possessed hardly any words but this work permit, another one across the street, and two signs indicating the address of some buildings. Whereas the normal pedestrian would walk right past this sign, we have to realize the significance that it holds to Renwick Street. While this little alley was once sought after as one of the greatest places for development, the place now seems forgotten. 22 Renwick seems to be the only luxury building that is finished, whereas other projects are taking a while to get finished or even started. The lack of punctuality, in terms of the work being completed, calls for this unexpected juxtaposition of new and old. Aesthetically, it is not pleasing. It is also unpleasant to think about commercialization and the destruction of valuable history for the sake of money. Having the brick facade buildings closed off with an expired work permit definitely questions the intentions of these contractors and basically confirms that they are investing a lot of money just to delay the slow and treacherous destruction of precious New York City history.

forlorn street

For now, Renwick Street will remain a mostly forlorn street with a luxury condo that is out of place, brick buildings that say so much about what used to be, and construction projects that are awaiting their fate.

Works Cited

Arak, Joey. “Renwick Street Gearing Up For More Construction Mess.” Curbed.
N.p., 28 May 2008. Web. 20 Sept. 2011. <http://ny.curbed.com/archives/
2008/05/28/renwick_street_gearing_up_for_more_construction_mess.php>.

September 28, 2011; A Walk Down Renwick  Street

Without actually walking through this small stretch of a street in West Soho, one would probably not be aware of what it holds. Three unfinished construction projects and one luxury condominium may not sound like too much, considering it is New York City, but it seems that it is more than what this little street can hold and handle. For one thing, the economy is the main reason as to why these construction projects are at a halt. There is just not enough money (and now interest) to continue building more luxury condos on this street when once a upon a time in near history, that seemed like the best way to utilize the space on this street. Walking past these abandoned, gated projects really gave me an unsettling feeling especially because the one condo, The Renwick, just seemed so out of place.

The original buildings on this street are still present. These brick row houses were mostly residential but “gave way to commercial properties, created by either replacing the rows completely or by enlarging and deepening the old buildings and adding new facades along the street (“Soho”).” Clearly, this is what happened to Renwick Street.

This street gives off a forlorn feeling because there are not many people around. As it is nestled in between multiple streets and the Holland Tunnel, not many pedestrians are seen here besides the residents of The Renwick luxury condo from time to time. There are papers blowing in the street as well, as if it really is an abandoned ghost street. The brick buildings also seem to loom over the street, empty and forgotten. It is unfortunate that this street was once sought after for real estate glory, but now is a sad example of what the economy is capable of.

Works Cited

“Soho.” Architecture in New York: a field study. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.nyu.edu/classes/finearts/nyc/&gt;.

OCTOBER 5, 2011; A Glimpse of Renwick Street in the Past

“Found Dead Under His Window”          

Although I could not rind many informative articles on how the street came about, there were a few happenings that were deemed important enough to be printed in the news. This article, found in the New York Times  historical database via Proquest, claims that 71- year old Lawrence Lamb was found dead under his window, having either jumped or fallen. He was employed at the City Prison as a guard until he resigned after a burglar escaped from the Tombs. It is dated back to 1893, a period of time in which living conditions were not the best. The Depression of 1893 was also one of the worst in American History, as unemployment rates exceeded 10% for half a decade (Whitten). Between 1892 and 1893, there was a 30% increase in suicide and immigrants accounted for 80% of those suicides (Lewenson).

Although there may be factors that seem like Lawrence Lamb may have taken his own life, we cannot make an exact conclusion or even make assumptions. What we can do is realize that these were unfortunate times in the United States and we can clearly see by this newspaper article that death was an occurrence that was written about in the news. In a time where depression rules the air, it is obvious as to why articles are written to match this negativity.

“Destructive Fire in Renwick-Street…”

This article was written on September 20, 1858. I just found it fascinating that so much information about money was posted in a newspaper article for the public to see. Yes, the damage done at Renwick Street from the fire was over $100,000. However, I find it interesting that they had to go into detail about how much each building was worth and how much insurance cost Mr. Newhouse had from each individual insurance company. It shows that privacy was not all that important, especially in the media. The public knew WHO the buildings belonged to (Mr. Newhouse), HOW MUCH each building was worth, THE LOCATION of each building, WHICH companies insured them, and HOW MUCH loss each building faced. They even included the fact that workers lost $30-$50 each from their tools. (Article is cut off.)

Works Cited 

“Found Dead Under His Window.” New York Times (1857-1922): 9. ProQuest. Jun 23 1893. Web. 5 Oct. 2011 <https://ezproxy.library.nyu.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/95053401?accountid=12768>.

Lewenson, Sandra B. “Looking Back: History and Decision-Making in Healthcare.” JB Learning. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2011. <http://www.jblearning.com/samples/0763744352/44352_CH02_Pass1.pdf&gt;.

“New-York City.” New York Times (1857-1922): 8. ProQuest. Sep 20 1858. Web. 5 Oct. 2011 <https://ezproxy.library.nyu.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/91413438?accountid=12768>.

Whitten, David O. “The Depression of 1893.” EH. N.p., 1 Feb. 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2011. <http://eh.net/encyclopedia/article/whitten.panic.1893&gt;.

OCTOBER 17, 2011; A Look at Renwick Using Archival Information/Non-Media Sources

2000 Census Tract – Population Density per Sq. Mile

Census Key

2007 Census Tract Estimates – Population Density per Sq. Mile

Shown here are the population densities of Soho/Hudson Square area where Renwick Street is located from 2000 and 2007, respectfully. The reason why I chose to show these two maps are because it is interesting to see the population increase, particularly near Renwick Street, when developers became interested in constructing more residential buildings in this seemingly profitable arae. As you can see, in less than 10 years, the population jumped from 5,000-7,000 to 7,000-9,000. It is an interesting increase to observe because of the construction projects that deemed this area as the new “it” spot.

I also wanted us to observe the difference in imagery from 1927 to the present:

First off, notice how modern the buildings are in the screenshot of the google maps image. This is not too surprising being that this area is mostly residential now and developers zeroed in on this area when it was not as popular as a place to live as it is now. The next difference is the amount of cars pictured. As mentioned in previous posts, Renwick Street is next to the Holland Tunnel, which was finished in 1927. Clearly there were not as many cars around then as there are now, which is the indication as to why the 1927 picture of Renwick Street could be taken without such traffic and it would be pretty hard to take a picture of Renwick Street from a similar angle without cars.

I just really wanted to emphasize the constant growth of New York City as not only a hub of people, but also a hub of modernity. We can clearly see these things from photographs, which are extremely important documentations throughout history, and also the maps that also preserve important census information for documentation as well.

Work Sources

Maps from Social Explorer

NYPL Digital Gallery

Google Maps

October 19, 2011

After what seemed like an eternity, I finally stumbled upon the mention of Renwick Street in a book called “Coming Out” by Wallace Hamilton, written in 1977. Unfortunately, google books only provides slight snippets of the context in which Renwick Street is used, but enough so that I can understand the usage of Renwick Street.

The only synopsis I could find online is as follows:

How do you tell the world you are gay? First you have to tell yourself. 

Roger Thornton was a vital, handsome, successful man in his forties, newly divorced, the father of two teen-age daughters, the lover of many women, when he invited Michael to his hotel room. He told himself he was simply curious about this extraordinarily good-looking, frankly gay young man. But Michael was scarcely in the room before he was in Roger Thornton’s arms — as the truth that Roger had so long concealed from the world and from himself emerged at last and for good.

This sensitive, moving novel of a divorced man’s entry into the gay world highlights the general difficulties that homosexuals face in a time where homosexuality is not widely accepted. Wallace Hamilton creates characters who readers are able to identify and grow attached to in order to express not only his sentiments towards homosexuality but also real problems that arise with the struggle for acceptance in society. One reviewer notes, “The most open and honest revelation of what it means to be gay in America today.” By “today”, he meant 1977, and by “America” he meant New York City.

Here, the mention of Renwick Street on multiple occasions:

Page 52

What we can get out of this first snippet is that although this book is fictional, the story takes place in New York City, an actual establishment that grounds the story in a believable reality of sorts. The location is indeed real as Renwick Street is north of Canal Street in New York. And yes, tenements did exist on this street in this time period. These little details are extremely important in making readers trust what the author has to say at all. The usage of this street is especially interesting because it is not a well-known street, first of all, and that the author chose this location out of the many streets in New York City asks readers to question what sentiments the author has with this area in particular.

Page 53

In this scene, it is obvious that something bad as happened. Even though it is hard to tell what the exact event was, one can assume that somebody had beaten Michael and he is left alone to stumble down Renwick Street toward Canal. You can sense the alienation and loneliness that Michael probably feels at this exact moment. The only “welcoming” fixtures are the lights on Canal that at least do not leave him in entire darkness.

Page 69

This part shows how grid functions as a memory device. Again, we do not know the exact happening in this scene but we know that when Michael thought about Renwick Street and what had happened there, he instantly shuddered and pressed close to Roger.

From these brief snippets alone, we can already see that this New York City novel grounds itself in what the quintessential New York City novel includes. We see alienation and loneliness as Roger tries to find his way, an ambivalent relationship with the rest of America (New York) on how he is viewed as a homosexual, and just the realistic backdrop of the actual city that is used to authenticate this story line. It is very interesting to see how we can get all of this out of the simple usage of one street in New York City.

Works Cited

http://webspace.webring.com/people/jj/jaytexas/booklist/bk0181.htm

http://laurustina.com/?p=1335

Google Books

October 26, 2011; Renwick Street in Film

Considering the general difficulty of finding information for my street, it was relatively easy finding Renwick Street in film. After Hours is a film from 1985, written by Joseph Minion and  directed by Martin Scorsese.

After Hours, 1985

This twilight-zone-esque film features Griffin Dunne as Paul, who meets with Marcy (Rosanna Arquette) at a coffee shop after work. After they part, she calls him to come over. On his journey there, things take a bizarre turn as he encounters angry cabbies, dead women, offbeat sculptresses and even “irate mobs led by ice cream truck drivers along the way.”

This is the location in which Paul interacts with Tom, the owner of the bar. Paul comes here to seek a bit of help when the subway fare has gone up to 1.50 from .90 and he doesn’t have enough money to get home. Continuing in the sequence in which Paul faces random events, Tom cannot open the cash register to help him.

This bar is located on 308 Spring Street and Renwick Street. In the movie it is depicted as the Terminal Bar, which was actually located across Port Authority bus terminal. It is actually the Emerald Pub, which looks like this:

Being that most of Paul’s journey takes place in Soho, it makes sense that the director would choose to use this bar. Another scene takes place in this area, just one building down actually on 307 Spring/Renwick Street:

The inside of the building is shown in the film. Julie, a woman Paul meets on the street near the bar, invites him over. However, when she asks him to stay he makes an excuse to leave.

This comedy/drama/thriller takes viewers on an exciting ride, with more freakish events that unfold at every turn. Eventually, the film is brought back full circle at the end. (You’ll see!)

Here is a review from the New York Times, if you want to get a critic’s take on the film: http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9C07E7DD153AF930A2575AC0A963948260

Works Cited

http://www.onthesetofnewyork.com/afterhours.html

November 1, 2011; Renwick Street at night

I ventured out to Renwick Street on a beautiful October night, and immediately noticed The Emerald Pub from the previous post. With its nice, yellow facade and freshly lighted sign, it is definitely hard to miss. I was around the area around 6PM, a time when people are just getting off of work and heading to bars to grab a drink with fellow co-workers and friends.

Interestingly enough, this was the first time I saw so much life around my street. I can assume this is because Renwick is mostly a residential area. People are not out and about during the day because they are most probably at work.

Despite traffic that surrounds the street because of the Holland Tunnel, Renwick is relatively peaceful and quiet. This, in turn, creates a comforting atmosphere in a sense.

As I just stood at the end of the street for a couple of minutes, there were people going to and from their homes. I would have asked them where they were coming from or where they were going, but I felt like that would be too intrusive. So, I merely observed and was pleasantly surprised to see that people did frequent the area when I once thought otherwise.

Although there was not much to observe on Renwick, because it is one block, it was nice to see the life that seemed to be missing on previous visits.

November 9, 2011; Renwick Street on television

As usual, I could not find much on Renwick Street so I opted for an area around my street. The Holland Tunnel is a highway tunnel that connects New York City with Jersey City. It sandwiches Renwick Street between itself and another street so the chaos and traffic of the tunnel does not interfere much with residents.

The Neistat Brothers, Casey and Van, was a television series in 2008 on HBO showcasing a collection of shorts strung together into a longer 30 minute show. The brief films were about the Neistats’ lives as they embarked on ‘adventures’ with their friends and families.

This short clip shows Van riding through the Holland Tunnel on his bike, which is illegal. It is surprisingly interesting and exhilarating because you do not know what is going to happen in the 5 minutes that he is riding.

The following video is not based around my street, but it is located in multiple spots in New York City. The Neistat brothers demonstrate how easy it is to steal bicycles in NYC.

Works Cited

http://neistatbrothers.com/neistat-hbo

November 16, 2011; Apprehending Sound

Sound is an interesting thing, because it can be interpreted as music or noise. By music, I mean it as a combination of different sounds that are heard as harmonious. By noise, I mean a cacophony of unpleasant sounds that can be heard as annoyance. Depending on personal tastes and experiences, sound is music or noise.

For my street, I decided not to just record what is heard at Renwick because I felt like it would be too typical. People already know what the streets of New York sound like, with traffic, chatter and daily “going-abouts”.  Instead, I wanted to find recordings of sound created in public spaces, not just streets, and private to semiprivate, semi-public places as well because the reading mentioned that modernity was shaped in these places.

For a public space near Renwick Street, I found a video on youtube of The Holland Tunnel that focuses on  the sounds that you hear in the tunnel meshed with music. This combination of street sound and man-made sound creates an interesting mix that reinforces that sound is indeed an interesting thing — how interpretation of sound is what determines what it is. Is sound an expression of freedom or noise that angers others?

As for a private to semi-private space, I found a music recording from a band, Hurray, that performed in the Renwick Gallery on Renwick Street.

For some brief history, the Renwick Gallery is a branch of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. It was designed by James Renwick Jr. in 1874. It was nearly complete when the civil war broke out. It was then used as a temporary military warehouse and to house the federal Court of Claims.

This recording/video is what would be considered music. Since it is a performance, first of all, one has a choice whether they want to stay for it or not. A normal person would leave if this music is not music to them, but noise. Hence, I believe that this shows how the Renwick Gallery acts as a space that shapes the perception of what type of sound the performance is in the first place.

Sound does not necessarily have to be music nor does it have to be noise. Although it is ultimately up to the listener’s discretion, the space that surrounds the sound definitely shapes what the sound is meant to be perceived as. The Holland Tunnel recording would be regarded as NOISE if it were not for the overlay of music because the recording consists of street sounds that people don’t generally enjoy. The band recording in the gallery would be regarded as MUSIC because it is a performance, but that does not necessarily mean everybody thinks it is.

Works Cited

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renwick_Gallery

“Streets, Sounds and Identity in Interwar Harlem” by Clare Corboul

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdbSAy8LWvU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IywbuzRKoR8

November 21, 2011; Renwick in Digital Form

“Google Maps is a Google service offering powerful, user-friendly mapping technology and local business information — including business locations, contact information, and driving directions.”

Google Maps is just one example of Web 2.0. Web 2.0 is associated with web applications that facilitate participatory information sharing, user-centered design, and collaboration online. These applications allow users to interact and collaborate with one another via social media and user-generated content. These applications are also taken for granted because they are just such a common part of our lives now as the digital era is taking over (and has been). “Ubiquitous computing seeks to embed computers into our everyday lives in such ways as to render them invisible and allow them to be taken for granted…”  (Galloway).

As you can see, the map presents an aerial view of Renwick Street and its surroundings. This gives users information about what location Renwick Street is in but also gives multiple methods of getting to the street. For directionally-challenged like myself, it is extremely convenient that there are step-by-step directions and even landmarks to check my steps against.

Even though there may not be much information about a place in the world that you are researching, like my street, you can always count on google to give you something. Even before having gone to my street to scope it out, I was able to get a feel for it by zooming in on the street and what was on it. Although this is convenient, I believe that it takes away from the mystery that is New York. Stumbling upon new areas of this concrete jungle of a city was once and still is a favorite pastime of many. With the rise of Web 2.0, people now have the convenience of “stumbling upon” new places right from their hand-held devices. The genuineness of discovery can seem a bit tainted, but with technological advancements being a norm in society nowadays, who can really define what is genuine anymore?

Another digital representation I found on Renwick Street was The Renwick website. The Renwick is a luxury condo. on my street. It is pretty nice on the outside because it has an all glass facade. However, it is not as nice as the website makes it look.  The website: http://www.therenwick.com/site/. When I visited my street, I had mentioned that there did not seem to be many people outside socializing much.

This picture shows otherwise:

The Renwick is brightly lit, there are people socializing in the lobby, and it seems like a very posh place to live. In actuality, there is not much going on in the street and there are not many people who mill together. This aspect of bringing about humanity and light to a rather bleak street is an interesting marketing technique that works, until you visit the actual building.

The introduction to the website is an interesting zoom of a digital street that presents The Renwick on a one block street with interesting and appealing neighborhoods around it (Tribeca and Soho). The simplicity and luxurious appeal in a digitized scope is really interesting to see, especially when compared to the actual street/building.

Works Cited

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0

http://maps.google.com/

http://www.therenwick.com/site/



Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: